News

Clinical Update: Are YOU brave enough to discuss incontinence? Women speak out about embarrassing issue

October 7, 2016

WOMEN across the country have appeared in a documentary aiming to raise awareness for adult incontinence - which affects one in three women in the UK.

Silenced by shame, nearly half - 45 per cent -  of sufferers admit that sensitive bladder affects their happiness and can leave them feeling embarrassed in a body they feel is older than their years.

Urinary incontinence is the unintentional passing of urine, which can either occur when the bladder is under pressure, for example when people cough or laugh or feel a sudden, intense urge to pass urine.

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Clinical Update: Unique Surgical Technique Prevents Postprostatectomy Incontinence

September 7, 2016

Surgeons from the Department of Urology, UP Faculty of Medicine, have achieved an outstanding success. They have developed a new technique which significantly reduces incontinence in patients who have undergone robotic surgery for prostate cancer. Their results were published in a prestigious journal of the European Association of Urology, European Urology, which features the most prominent studies in the field.

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Clinical Update: HEALTH LINES: Incontinence does not have to ruin one’s life

September 7, 2016

What is the smartest muscle in the human body? One obvious possibility is the ocular (eye) musculature, which allows both eyes to move in perfect coordination. Or, how about the diaphragm, which knows exactly how hard we need to breathe? Another possibility is the heart muscle. Surely the muscle that keeps us all alive has to be the smartest.

The correct answer is actually the anal sphincter muscle. What other muscle allows us to tell the difference between a solid, liquid or gas? For example, what other muscle prevents us from passing gas in front of the preacher?

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Clinical Update: Apollo sets up clinics to treat incontinence

August 24, 2016

Many women who have incontinence keep silent about it and restrict themselves from leading a normal lifestyle. In an attempt to devise planned intervention or a clinical pathway to help such women who suffer in silence, Apollo Hospitals has launched continence clinics in a couple of places in the city.

The clinics, which were launched by the Apollo Hospitals on Tuesday, will be opened at the OMR and Karapakkam branches of the hospital, said Preetha Reddy, executive vice-chairperson, Apollo Hospitals.

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Clinical Update: Urinary incontinence in men: Causes, symptoms, and treatment

August 24, 2016

Urinary incontinence (UI) or loss of bladder control in men is not uncommon, but it can be treated once the cause is determined.

Uncontrollable urine in men or urinary incontinence occurs in eleven to 34 percent of older men, but it is not just an issue that impacts the aging. Younger men can also experience UI due to health problems. Urinary incontinence also happens to women, but the biggest issue with UI in men is that they are less likely to speak with their doctors about it. This means that the statistics could actually be much higher in men that the current numbers indicate. Discussing the problem is the first step to addressing the symptoms and finding a treatment.

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Clinical Update: Is urinary incontinence a predictor of death?

August 24, 2016

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary loss of urine and whilst it’s an embarrassing problem, most people don’t think of it as deadly.  

But a recent and comprehensive study found urinary incontinence is “a predictor of higher mortality in the general and particularly in the geriatric population”. 

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Clinical Update: Let’s talk about it: Stress incontinence

August 24, 2016

The occasional dribble. Some bothersome tinkle. And the downright pee-pee or piddle.

Whatever hush-hush code words they use to describe it, more than half of U.S. women over the age of 50 suffer at some point in their life from unintentional, unexpected and often embarrassing urine leakage – known medically as stress incontinence, according to Seattle specialists with Swedish Medical Center.

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Clinical Update: Botox injections treat overactive bladder almost as effectively as oral medications for incontinence

August 24, 2016

Botox injections treat overactive bladder almost as effectively as oral medications for incontinence. Urinary incontinence is a common problem that is characterized by the loss of bladder control, when the bladder muscles become either too weak (stress incontinence) or too active (overactive bladder). Prostate problems and nerve damage can both increase the risk of urinary incontinence.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of Botox to treat the overactive bladder condition in adults. The treatment involves injecting small doses of Botox into the bladder muscles using a small instrument inserted through the urethra. Once Botox is injected, it blocks the release of the chemicals that cause muscle spasms, thus bringing on temporary muscle paralysis.

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Clinical Update: The pelvic floor, peeing yourself and incontinence: What no one tells you about having a baby

August 24, 2016

When Laura Foster, 27, gave birth to her daughter Kinsley last September, no one warned her about the less dignified aspects of becoming a mother.

“A couple weeks after I had her, I sneezed when I was sitting on the couch feeding her and I peed myself. I was like, ‘Oh my goodness.’ Of course my husband starts laughing. I’m stuck in this position,” Foster said.

Giving birth can do serious damage to the pelvic floor — the supportive muscles and connective tissue surrounding the bladder, lower intestines, and in women, the uterus.

This can result in all sorts of issues, from back pain to organ prolapse to painful sex, but one of the most common and debilitating is urinary incontinence, which affects about a third of new mothers.

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Clinical Update: Carol Smillie And Annabel Croft talk About Adult Incontinence; "We Should Be Helping Women, Not Ridiculing Them"

August 24, 2016

Urinary incontinence is a big problem which is kept well hidden. Even though millions of women, regardless of age struggle with it, the condition remains a taboo subject.

Here, TV presenter Carol Smillie and former British Number One tennis player Annabel Croft, talk about how their teenage girls' monthly periods inspired the development of the DiaryDoll pants.
Originally made for young women worried about heavy periods whilst at school, playing sport or at a sleepover, the product soon proved popular with the many sufferers of stress incontinence (estimated to affect 1 in 3 women in the UK) and women with sensitive bladder, also known as pelvic floor weakness which is experienced during and after maternity (believed to affect around 9 million women in the UK).
 
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